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Profile robertmiles
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Message 1394 - Posted: 27 May 2014, 1:19:12 UTC

Some articles that may affect what diseases you work on in the future:

Syracuse University scientists discover how some bacteria may steal iron from their human hosts
http://www.syr.edu/news/articles/2008/Syracuse-University-scientists-discover-how-.html
includes tuberculosis and related bacteria

Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition in Bacillus anthracis and related strains
http://mic.sgmjournals.org/content/156/7/1918.full.pdf
for anthrax

Iron compounds synthesized to combat tuberculosis
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-11/f-sf-ics112610.php

Heavy metals boost immunity
http://www2.cnrs.fr/en/1905.htm
for tuberculosis

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Message 1396 - Posted: 1 Jun 2014, 16:00:51 UTC

Antibiotics based on a new principle may defeat MRSA
http://ki.se/en/news/antibiotics-based-on-a-new-principle-may-defeat-mrsa
Likely to work on tuberculosis also


Humanized nonobese diabetic-scid IL2rγnull mice are susceptible to lethal Salmonella Typhi infection
http://www.pnas.org/content/107/35/15589
for typhoid fever


Cranberry Juice Shows Promise Blocking Staph Infections
http://www.wpi.edu/news/20101/cranstaph.html
for MRSA


A novel recombinant human lactoferrin augments the BCG
vaccine and protects alveolar integrity upon infection with
Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19428915


Crusade for iron: iron uptake in unicellular eukaryotes and its significance for virulence.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18467097
Many of the pathogens use specialized method for acquiring iron and cannot live without it.
Therefore, you may want to target the proteins used for iron acquisition by pathogens and not used by humans.


Crippling Virus Set to Conquer Western Hemisphere
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/344/6185/678.summary

Profile robertmiles
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Message 1403 - Posted: 7 Jun 2014, 1:16:56 UTC

YbeY is essential for fitness and virulence of V. cholerae, keeps RNA household in order
http://www.sciencecodex.com/ybey_is_essential_for_fitness_and_virulence_of_v_cholerae_keeps_rna_household_in_order-135148
For many bacteria, including cholera and tuberculosis

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Message 1405 - Posted: 9 Jun 2014, 5:06:44 UTC

Garlic Compound Effective Against Killer MRSA ‘Superbugs’ – New Evidence
http://www.alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=40135&CultureCode=en

Aurel
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Message 1406 - Posted: 9 Jun 2014, 15:49:52 UTC - in response to Message 1405.
Last modified: 9 Jun 2014, 15:50:02 UTC

Hi Robert,

to make it easy: http://www.hon.ch/HONselect/RareDiseases/index.html

All informations you´ll need you can find on the huge NCBI-Database, which is computed by SIMAP and some Super-Computers.

So, there is so many work outside...

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Message 1408 - Posted: 10 Jun 2014, 2:04:10 UTC

Iron acquisition in Vibrio cholerae.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17216354
for cholera


Aurel, are you aware that much of the SIMAP work is done by ordinary computers through their BOINC interface?

http://boincsimap.org/boincsimap/

However, they plan to shut down their BOINC interface by the end of 2014.

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Message 1413 - Posted: 19 Jun 2014, 4:20:30 UTC

Nasty Mosquito-Borne Virus, Now in Puerto Rico, Expanding its Reach
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2014/06/18/nasty-mosquito-borne-virus-now-in-puerto-rico-expanding-its-reach/

Aurel
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Message 1414 - Posted: 27 Jun 2014, 22:03:26 UTC - in response to Message 1408.

Iron acquisition in Vibrio cholerae.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17216354
for cholera


Aurel, are you aware that much of the SIMAP work is done by ordinary computers through their BOINC interface?

http://boincsimap.org/boincsimap/

However, they plan to shut down their BOINC interface by the end of 2014.


Yea, I now that. But SIMAP runs only for NCBI, but the problem is the list. No test are running now, to stop these dissease...

I´ll plan to relaunch the project, after shutting down, but I´ll edit the codes and edit some functions from the quantum mechanics. We need to understand our corpse, now! We don´t unterstand our brain, we are under 1%. (Yes, I know MindModeling and HumanBrainProject(EU-Project))

I think the NCBI uses his own Supercomputer to get faster results, but the costs will be very high...They will come back!

Adam Conley
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Message 1416 - Posted: 31 Jul 2014, 21:38:36 UTC

I realize current events bring it a little more to the forefront - but Ebola might be a good one to tackle.

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Message 2047 - Posted: 28 Feb 2015, 4:48:47 UTC - in response to Message 1416.

I realize current events bring it a little more to the forefront - but Ebola might be a good one to tackle.


World Community Grid has already tackled Ebola, although with such a small stream of workunits so far that this can be hard to notice.

Profile Michael H.W. Weber
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Message 2264 - Posted: 11 Apr 2015, 11:34:04 UTC

For bacteria, at least to my point of view, the most promising drug compounds are those that act by destroying the organism's cell walls. Bacteriophages (viruses selectively infecting bacteria, even all those antibiotic-resitant ones) provide a whole battery of genes ecoding functions involved in just doing that. So, they may serve as excellent working examples to copy from.

Michael.

P.S.: Plasmodium is of course a different story.
____________

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Message 2270 - Posted: 12 Apr 2015, 0:42:45 UTC

I've read an article suggesting that cyanobacteria may be the cause of Alzheimer's, since an amino acid called BMAA is often found in the brains of those who have died from Alzheimer's, and seldom found elsewhere except in blue-green algae and cyanobacteria.

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Message 2271 - Posted: 12 Apr 2015, 9:19:57 UTC - in response to Message 2270.
Last modified: 12 Apr 2015, 9:42:44 UTC

I've read an article suggesting that cyanobacteria may be the cause of Alzheimer's, since an amino acid called BMAA is often found in the brains of those who have died from Alzheimer's, and seldom found elsewhere except in blue-green algae and cyanobacteria.

There has been a quite long discussion (in English) on Swedish Kunskapskanalen from Uppsala University (the king has been in the auditory), I posted about it on CPDN Beta :

CO2 effect on Cyanobacteria

Scroll a bit down to find references to the guy who was explaining the problem.

I searched for a video of this TV program on the Kunskapskanalen web site online but no luck. It might be there but I can only read little Swedish :-/

p.s.: Afaik. they repeat it now and then. If you have a chance to watch it, do it - that guy (Paul Alan Cox) really impressed me, he explained that complicated stuff in a way so everyone can understand it.

p.p.s.: It was about 3 different diseases, Alzheimer, Parkinson and one more that had been unfamiliar to me (I think it was TSE but I'm not sure about that).

Gunde
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Message 2527 - Posted: 6 Aug 2015, 20:38:26 UTC - in response to Message 2271.

Could be this?
http://www.ur.se/Produkter/170138-UR-Samtiden-Miljo-och-framtidstro-Klimatet-och-halsan

Thanks for the tip, there was interesting video about cyanobacteria.
This could be linked to ALS and could be found in sea, lakes, animals and in the desert.

BMMA being created by miss-fold protein.

If you can´t play the video there is a shorter video at TED to.
http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Secrets-to-Alzheimers-ALS-and-P

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Message 2529 - Posted: 7 Aug 2015, 0:50:38 UTC - in response to Message 2527.

Could be this?
http://www.ur.se/Produkter/170138-UR-Samtiden-Miljo-och-framtidstro-Klimatet-och-halsan

Maybe - it offers something that mentions cyanobacteria, but all the instructions for reaching it are in Swedish, and I couldn't follow them well enough to reach whatever it is.

Thanks for the tip, there was interesting video about cyanobacteria.
This could be linked to ALS and could be found in sea, lakes, animals and in the desert.

BMMA being created by miss-fold protein.

The video below appear to say that BMAA may replace serine in proteins, and therefore cause protein miss-folding.

If you can´t play the video there is a shorter video at TED to.
http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Secrets-to-Alzheimers-ALS-and-P

The shorter video is interesting enough that I'll mention it in a few places that mention Alzheimer's or ALS.

Ananas
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Message 2530 - Posted: 8 Aug 2015, 16:25:27 UTC - in response to Message 2527.

Could be this?
http://www.ur.se/Produkter/170138-UR-Samtiden-Miljo-och-framtidstro-Klimatet-och-halsan ...


Yes this is the one, thanks :-)

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Message 2843 - Posted: 14 Dec 2016, 1:06:15 UTC
Last modified: 14 Dec 2016, 1:06:41 UTC

An article on finding a possible treatment for a neglected tropical disease, sleeping sickness (Trypanosomiasis, human African)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/els-torreele-sleeping-sickness_us_5833698ce4b099512f845007

Project Zero
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/topic/project-zero
A series of articles on neglected tropical diseases

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